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20121202
20121210
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Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
that because of hurricane sandy, job creation might have been a little slower last month, the unemployment rate might have stayed a little bit higher. it turns out that sandy did have an impact, but not on the headline numbers. >> if you look deeper in the report, you do see that over a million workers who normally work full time were reduced to part-time hours during the reference week because of bad weather, and over 300,000 additional workers weren't able to work at all because of bad weather. >> reporter: and because of the way the labor department calculates or figures out and decides -- defines who is working part time, full time or working at all and when, sandy's impact did not show up in the overall numbers. but one thing did. as you mentioned, 350,000 people left the work force, about the same number stayed in, and that is what put downward pressure on the unemployment rate taking it down to 7.7. heather? heather: peter barnes reporting live from the white house, thank you. so what can the federal government do to kick start the economy and get more americans back to work in the new y
. the positive side, again, hurricane sandy appears not to have been the job killer many had feared. the labor department says the havoc wrought by sandy had no substantial impact on the unemployment picture. with us now, jill schlessinger, editor at la w manyre the jobs aart me ,ow m t are seasonal jobs? >> not so many seasonal. we saw some broad based gains and we continue to see some really robust gains in retail, in business services, health care is really continuing to show great improvement. you mentioned manufacturing. mentioned one other area, 20,000 jobs lost in construction. that may be a little bit of sandy related. >> but also, one of the interesting things, you looked at the numbers and said there was 300,000 people that said weather did affect the job surge. why is that not considered sandy related? >> it is weird because there are two different surveys when you look at these jobs numbers. one comes from the businesses. the businesses, they take that survey, november 12th, and the businesses are for the job creation number. the other survey is called a household survey. that's h
the pull back because of hiring being depressed because of hurricane sandy. maybe you'll see some of that in the next month, but this was a strong report on its surface. digging in the numbers. look at the right side on that graphic, 14.4% underemployment. the percentage of people working, eligible in the work force, 63.6%, you want that higher, too. >> we also learned about 350,000 people last month simply gave up and stopped looking for work, and that potentially caused that little drop in the unemployment rate. >> that's right. that's important to note, too, 350,000 gave up working. these could be people that are retiring early, taking early social security and they're getting out of the labor market. it could also be people, wolf, who have been on extended unemployment benefits, they roll off the benefits, try to find work for a couple months, they don't, so they drop out, too. >> are the november numbers part of a trend we've been seeing? what does this portend down the road. >> you have on average 151,000 jobs a month, the monthly average. the last couple months before now w
to get up. >> you okay, buddy? >> more than a month after superstorm sandy, a family living in a borrowed apartment is trying to put its life back together. >>> plus, back behind bars. john mcafee under arrest and get this. he's blogging from jail. >>> and could an online review of a business get you sued? a new case raises the question, just how far can you go when you sound off online? tonight our guest, thomas sargent. nobel laureate in economics, and one of the most cited economists in the world. professor sargent, can you tell me what cd rates will be in two years? no. if he can't, no one can. that's why ally has a raise your rate cd. ally bank. your money needs an ally. wooohooo....hahaahahaha! oh...there you go. wooohooo....hahaahahaha! i'm gonna stand up to her! no you're not. i know. you know ronny folks who save hundreds of dollars switching to geico sure are happy. how happy are they jimmy? happier than a witch in a broom factory. get happy. get geico. fifteen minutes could save you fifteen percent or more. hurry in and try five succulent entrees, like our tender snow crab pair
. >> hurricane sandy hit in a major population portion in the united states. with that hurricane moving through, we saw people driving a whole lot less. >> reporter: with plenty of gas going around, and not much demand, we the consumer have the upper hand. many are taking the opportunity to fill up and enjoy while it lasts. so, where can you find the cheapest gas? according to gasbuddy.com, the honor goes to missouri at nearly $3. but the good news for everyone around the country, experts predict we'll see these prices stay down at least until february. dan and bianna. >> good tips and some good news finally. john, thank you. >>> we're 23 days and counting until the nation falls off the fiscal cliff. president obama and house speaker boehner are going mano e mano in negotiations. >> let's bring in george stephanopoulos. george, i'm going to ask this question until this thing is over. >> we had another week of massive trash-talking, are we closer or further away from getting a deal? >> it's hard to know. but they're not really talking right now. that's what's most incredible. you pointed out tha
is going to lose. ♪ bill: there is a new report that super storm sandy cost the economy $60 billion, for lost productivity and output. rick leventhal is live in staten island, new york where some industries have actually benefitted. what is the story there, rick? >> reporter: of koerbs, bil course, the businesses directly in the storm surge, retail and restaurants a lot of them have suffered dramatically. other businesses, contractors and home improvement have done very, very well. roofers, landscapers, electrical contractors. this couple run a electrical business and you guys have been crazy busy right? >> yes, since the storm we had hen emergency influx of emergency work. we are aeurbl to hire back some of the people we had laid off and we are looking to hire more people to handle the work that is coming in. >> reporter: you have more work than you can even do yourselves. >> wyatt this point. >> reporter: and you see what, no end in sight? >> we see this generating a very long term, at least a year, two years hopefully. >> reporter: it's great that they are actually able to employ
house is anticipating sending up a $60 billion supplemental request for damage related to sandy, and i think tomorrow would be that day. at least according to press reports. the gentleman may know that the fema director testified to the house yesterday that the agency can meet its need through the spring associated with the disaster. approximately $2 billion has been delivered with about $5 billion remaining in the disaster relief fund. so, again, no one is here saying we don't want to deliver the necessary aid to the victims because that is a priority. and -- but looking forward to receiving that request and taking a look at the numbers and the need to make sure we can move forward on that as well. and lastly, mr. speaker, postal reform. you know, the gentleman and i have, yes, talked about this a lot. know that the issue has to do with the obligations of the postal service and how we can address those to create a more balanced prospect for the future, to allow for its continuance. so we are looking at that as well and the gentleman knows there's a lot of discussion, both bipartisan a
joy behar -- >> stephanie: yes! >> this is the comics benefit for sandy relief. it will be with colin quinn, daryle hammond, susie essman rosy perez, and me. you can come to the actual big show monday night at www.92y/org comics. >> stephanie: do it. >> i think people actually spell susie essman to insult them. >> stephanie: yes. [♪ "world news tonight" theme ♪] >> stephanie: representative washington fox. >> oh yeah. >> stephanie: the republican in north carolina she [ inaudible ] a lonely staff member for daring to step foot in the members only elevator. the regular elevator was being occupied by furniture movers and as soon as fox stepped into the elevator she allegedly demanded to know for who the staffer worked before demanding that she get out. and then she directed to the sign posted in the elevator and said i just hope we are hiring people that know how to read. >> wow! [ applause ] >> stephanie: karl rove will be fax on fox news. >> did a producer get permission. >> stephanie: yeah doing fox business, barney and company. >> nobod
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)